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Reading Round-up December 2019

7 Jan

Reading Round-up November 2019

6 Dec

Bit late but……………… well….. here!

Reading Round-up October 2019

31 Oct

Happy Halloween y’all! Here’s some more stuff I’ve read that you should too:

Reading Round-up September 2019

1 Oct

Feeling driven to post something so here’s a quick round-up of some articles about books/reading/etc. that I found interesting last month. Enjoi~

Voting open for Academic Book Week’s Most Influential Banned Books

1 Mar

Most Influential Banned Book

Academic Book Week has marked its first day by inviting the reading public to vote on the ‘most influential banned book’, from a shortlist selected by academic booksellers across the UK and Ireland, in association with Index on Censorship.

A list of 20 books that have been historically banned (from… sale? reading? circulation? academia? Never quite know.) have been revealed today on the Academic Book Week website with votes closing midnight 6 March. The winning book will be announced during the Week.

Wording is a little unclear, as the phrases “most influential banned book” and “vote for your favourite” both appear, and I am not sure the world’s most impactful book is necessarily the audience favourite.

Either way I voted for To Kill A Mockingbird.

You can vote here, and let me know what you chose because I’m nosy.

The Return of the King

10 Mar
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Artist’s representation of a bunch of dudes reading my blog

Hello hi I’m thinking about bringing Gliterature back this year. I was going to do it anyway but this week the intimidatingly cool Lil Nonbinary Fashion linked to me and I’m panicking that I haven’t put up any new content since before I was born.

This is what I’ve learned from the search terms bringing y’all here to the site during my absence:

  • I should probably stop using the word ‘porn’ or ‘sex’ in blog titles
  • A lot of you really want me to do a review of Teresa Crane’s ‘Green and Pleasant Land‘ for some reason
  • People searching for “fathers in literature” and “why vampires suck now” still end up here, so those topics are timeless and I should do more of them
  • The most traffic comes in from my posts about Lime Crime makeup and Lolita feminism which are…. not book-related. So less of that in future
  • Folk are still searching for “solipsistic socialite” and as far as I know I’m the only person online to use that moniker & I am touched
  • Fair amount of Googlers can related to the Calvin & Hobbes quote “being a parent means wanting to hug and strangle your kid at the same time” make of that what you will
  • More of you are thirsty for Jedward than you will admit
  • Many of you were lost. Go in peace

I’m gonna think of some topics, perhaps, and post them, maybe. I do have plenty of drafts but they don’t seem appropriate. One is a bunch of 100-word reviews for the 100 books I read in 2014 – that was a while ago. One is a recipe for Hundred Acre Woods Honey Biscuits but I am vegan now. A lot are half-written book reviews for books that are no longer Fresh & New. I also wrote up an introduction to The Book Fairies, thought about it, and decided Book Crossing is still way better. I’ll think of something.

Speak to you later I love you byeeee x

Lit Lyrics: Oh, Mr. Darcy – The Doubleclicks

20 Mar

Book Riot covered this song last year but I feel the need to bring it to all y’all’s attention because these bespectacled ladies from Portland have dedicated this song Mr Darcy and Colin Firth, the hunkiest reincarnation of the character that history has so far witnessed. And as we all know, Mr Darcy is the hunkiest dreamboat in all of literature to begin with.

Here it is:

This song remains really lovely and sarcastic at the same time. I can relate to lovely and sarcastic at the same time. The original video is worth a watch too. In fact, like me, you might want to spend the evening going through their YouTube backlog of love songs to internet trolls and D&D players, and cello covers of the Trogdor the Burninator theme song.

Happy Friday night!

Mike Stilkey Paints on Books

19 Mar

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Much like artist Ekaterina Panikanova, whose work Gliterature has covered before, Mike Stilkey makes sculptures and installations from salvaged books that he paints to depict humans and animals to startling result. Continue reading

Learning How to Decipher Elvish Does Not Actually Take an Entishly Long Time!

17 Oct

Picture courtesy of superstevied.

Gi suilon! Êl síla erin lû e-govaned vîn.

Did you know that the languages were the first thing that Tolkien created for his mythical universe? According to the author, his stories grew out of his languages as he creates races to speak the tongues he had constructed. Quenya (high-elven) was the first, and most complete, of these languages, the other being Sindarin (grey-elven).

Elvish is strongly influenced by Finnish and Welsh, but is surprisingly easy to learn how to use! It also looks particularly nice in a gift card with a dozen freshly baked loaves of Lembas Bread.

Using the examples of ‘Robert’ and ‘Lynne’, Star Chamber gives us a step-by-step instruction on learning the language of elves — and writing with it — in under ten minutes. They also provide a handy alphabet key  if, like me, you want to cheat your way through this linguistics course. Continue reading

Abandonment Issues

15 Oct
My Eldest Daughter, Suzanne with Milk and Book by Carl Larsson, 1904.

My Eldest Daughter, Suzanne with Milk and Book by Carl Larsson, 1904.

What are your thoughts on leaving a novel unfinished? Some of you, I’m sure, will persevere through the most plot-holed purple prose imaginable. Others will have hard and fast rules — preferring to stop after the first page, or abandoning a book on the third chapter if they’re not really feeling it.

Apparently the rule for what page to abandon a book is 100 minus your age. For me, this means calling it quits on page 77. But I feel like the reasoning behind this rule is a bit morbid. Does it mean that as you get older, your days are numbered and you have less time to waste on bad books?!

The Copybot has a little tip for knowing when to call it quits:

You probably didn’t know this, but there’s an instinct to abandoning a book. Sort of like foraging for food. Except you are foraging for information. You are following a scent. An information scent.

And if while reading a book you lose that scent, you should stop and move onto something else.

Goodreads has a great infographic on the psychology of abandonment and it’s pretty interesting reading.

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What is it about a book that makes you put it down? These readers give reasons like “slow, boring”, “weak writing” and “when an author is committed to doing something I hate”. All valid points. However, I would never quit reading a book because I thought it was “immoral”, or “I didn’t like the main character”! ‘Lolita’, anyone?

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I’m actually guilty of abandoning 3/5 of the most begun-but-not-finished classics… and that’s only because I returned to ‘Lord of the Rings’ after the movies came out. However, there’s still time for me to go back and finish the rest!

I have read some truly awful books in my life. And I have started some truly amazing ones, never to finish them.

Sometimes, driven by the thrill of the conquest, I’ll feel like I’ve invested too much time to give up. And what if I miss something important?! There are potentially life-changing words in every abandoned book. Other times, I’ll just lose interest and put the book aside.

There isn’t really a consensus for what makes me read on to the final page!

What about you?